• Corus Quay, Corus Entertainment's new Toronto headquarters, features 74 television feeds, three Toronto radio stations (Q107, AM640 Toronto Radio and 102.1 the Edge), three television studios, fully-digitized production facilities, an animation studio, a publishing company and several performance spaces.
  • The building is home to over 1,000 Corus employees.
  • Corus Quay was constructed in three years and officially opened in September 2010.
  • Corus Quay's technological storage structure is approximately 5 petabytes which equals 5,000 terabytes, or 5,000,000 gigabytes.
  • Corus Quay houses a 2 megawatt hybrid diesel/natural gas broadcast generator on its roof.
  • There are 165 wireless access points in the building.
  • Corus Quay has approximately 560 kilometres of data cabling. This does not include electrical and video wiring.
  • The Orientation space in the lobby features 48 large LCD monitors.
  • Corus Quay has 4,500 individually controlled lights.
  • 20% of all materials in the building came from within 800 kilometres of the site.
  • The wood wall treatment in the Orientation and Atrium space is hemlock reclaimed from a 1910 ferry terminal wharf in the Toronto harbour.
  • Bicycle storage has been designed for over 70 bikes.
  • Materials and furniture choices were filtered through a low-emissions, low impact and sustainable filter.
  • A five-storey bio-wall in the Atrium improves air quality in the building. The plants naturally clean the air and reduce energy consumption.
  • There are over 100 collaboration spaces at Corus Quay.
  • Great Big Sea were the first musical performers to use Corus Quay’s performance studio on September 26, 2010.
  • The building features three public art installations created by award-winning U.K.-based artists Troika – “Shoal” features 467 independently computer controlled, iridescent acrylic fish that “liquefy” the ceiling of the public corridor which traverses the building; “Drizzle”, a light installation that uses multiple exterior soffit light fixtures to immerse visitors in a shower of refracted colour simulating rain drops; and “Lightning Bolt”, a 40-foot high installation that hangs over the Atrium in a dramatic replication of nature.